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of the law professor. the theory of interpretation set forth here is that it is a very humbling one. it does not leave a whole lot up to the policy discretion of the judge, in fact, leaves nothing. the name of the game is to give the fairest reading to what the people's representatives have enacted. that's what a judge is supposed to do. now, that is an uncongenial approach to someone who wants to do good, who wants to use his office as it can be used to do things that he thinks are good for the society. if one has that zeal, one will not like the approach set forth in this book. c-span: and in the earlier part, which you have label under "forward," you have a sentence here, "every lawyer, every citizen concerned about how the judiciary rises above politics and produces a government of law and not of men should find this book invaluable." you know this, you just got accused of being political at the enof the -- end of the term. >> guest: was i accused of being political? i was out of the country. i don't read that stuff. c-span: what happens when you hear them say, oh, he's the most politica
talks about religious cases in u.s. history to transform the laws of the country and eliminated protection to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview part of booktv's college series was recorded at the university of pennsylvania will -- pennsylvania. it's about 20 minutes. >> university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of her nation's history with the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organization and so on, and in the early decades of the 20 century that began to shift. the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and exercise clauses of the first amendment against the state, sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states for control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did indeed that the first amendment
lynn for us. >> thank you. >> next, a foreign on state and federal marijuana laws. then a discussion on combating terrorism and national security laws. after that, google executive eric schmidt taking about the latest innovations. >> tomorrow on "washington journal," atlantic editor at large steve clemons and gary schmitt discuss former nebraska senator chuck hagel. and we talk about the book "breakout nations" exploring what makes economies breakout or break down. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern live on c-span. >> now a discussion about legalizing marijuana and federal state relations. colorado and washington state recently legalized the recreation nal use of marijuana but it continues to be illegal under federal law. this brookings event is just over an hour and a half. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> welcome, everybody. thank you very much for coming. my name is jonathan roush. i'm a guest scholar in governance studies here at brookings. it's very good of you to come on a cold day wh
. >>> on a big day, in a big week on the debate over gun control, we begin with a very low-profile gun law that's there are on the books. a law you probably don't know about, hidden in a very surprising place. we think you need to know about this law, because critics say it damages our ability to truly know, using serious science, the impact that guns have on public health and public safety, impeding research on gun safety, and preventing doctors from talking to patients about the potential health risks that come with gun ownership. advocates who support the law say it protects the rights of gun owners. the national rifle association somehow managed to put this stealth legislation into president obama's health care reform bill. the question is how and why. and why, whatever you think of a law, one of the president's top allies, that's right, the president's ally, helped the nra get it passed. no surprise that there's a big dose of politics involved here. jim acosta tonight is keeping 'em honest. >> when president obama signed national health care reform into law, few in washington knew that bur
, and we'll start by asking you what changes, if any, you'd like to see in immigration law. here are the numbers to call. democrats, 202-585-3880. republicans, 202-585-3881. and independent callers, 202-585-3882. we also have a live set up for illegal immigrants. they can call us at 202-585-3883. we're also online. you can join the conversation on social media. accepted us a tweet by writing, @cspanwj. or chime in on facebook. look for c-span to weigh in there. we also take emails, journal @c-span.org. interceptions of immigrants stubborning low, border security efforts have a long way to go. it says -- host: from the "new york times," we also see a piece this week looking at a new study on enforcement and the money spent enforcing immigration laws. it says a new report sets the stage for a debate on immigration overhaul, huge amounts of money spent on immigration. joining us this morning to get our conversation started is off and on johnson of national journal. she's a washington, d.c., correspondent who covers immigration among a variety of other topics. thanks for being here.
>> george: today on christian world news, russia passes a law banning american families from adopting russian children. what it means for that country's 700,000 orphans. and a shocking story of christian persecution in nepal. the most hindu nation in the world. plus, descendents of an ancient tribe of israel return to their home. how christians are helping to fulfill biblical prophecy. ♪ >> george: a new russian law bans americans from adopting russian children. hello, everyone, i'm george thomas. my colleague, wendy griffith is on holiday. russian president va vladimir putin signed a law preventing thousands of russian orphans to go to americans. john waggi plains. >> reporter: michelle mobley has quite a collection of toys and clothes. they were gathering them for a little one who would soon join them. >> we always wanted to adopt. we decided this is the time. >> reporter: the christian nebraska couple has a blog site telling of their wait for 6-year-old artem, who spent his whole life in a russian orphanage. his mother gave him up when she learned he had down syndrome. b
. and that's really where his eyes have been. until he comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> and now, more from booktv's college series. we sat down with ste nose bibas at the university of pennsylvania's annenberg school for communication to discuss his book, "the machinery of criminal justice." he argues that our criminal justice system has become a process that values efficiency and speedy processing over reforming criminals and healing victims and their families. it's about innocents. it's about ten minutes. >> host: and now joining us on booktv is author and professor stephanos bibas whose new book, "the machinery of criminal justice," is published by oxford university press. professor bibas, do we have an efficient criminal justice system? >> guest: we've got a system tahas moved from what people expect it to be, a public morality play where we blame and punish and then reintegrate people who do wrong and heal victims to one that's been taken over by the lawyers. we have professionals who have max
and texas, can going out to enact reforms but in 2004 and 2008 mississippi, for example, enacted laws that expand a parole eligibility and a limited their truth in sentencing law, placing parole restrictions on nonviolent offenders. they said you're serving a nonviolent offense you can be eligible for parole after serving 25% of your sense rather than 85% of your sins. those reform projected to save the state about $450 million between 2008-2012 and reduce its prison population growth by a very significant percentage. since 2008 mississippi's crime rate has fallen to its lowest level since 1984. kentucky is another state enacted a law that a limited pretrial attention for many drug offenses including marijuana possession, and instituted probation for drug possession have reduced sentences for -- that reform is projected to save the state $422 million by 2020 and reduce its prison population growth by almost 19%. in ohio, in 2011, ohio and acted a lot about a limited crack cocaine sentencing disparity. pass a series of measured. these reforms were unthinkable when i was litigating case
to "hannity" and right behind me sitting in our audience tonight are law abiding new york gun owners. now, their names and addresses were printed by a local new york news, simply because they are legal owners of firearms. thanks to the publisher, the families of the people behind me sitting in our audience have not been at risk and privacy trampled on and tonight they're here to voice their frustrations and fears. we're going to examine what legal action they can take against the blatant invasion of privacy and thanks to all of you for being here. how are you all doing tonight? let me start with a quick show of hands from everybody here, you've all been outed and how many here have been outed, almost everybody, right? you have not and you three, so i want to make sure who has that -- how many of you feel angry about what has happened here? everybody. how many of you feel your privacy has been invaded? how many feel you are less safe because of what has happened? everybody. all right, let's start. why, let's say. >> not so much-- i feel worried about my neighbors because now they're people
parenthood violating federal law by using taxpayer money to fund abortions? we'll zero in on a very disturbing situation. in many ways we have lost our guts. we have lost our courage. we have lost our spine. >> bill: what does dan rather think about a newspaper printing the names of americans who can legally possess firearms? what does rosie o'donnell think? how about barbra streisand and michael moore? we asked them all. we will tell you what happened. >> do my best for our country. for those i represent at the pentagon and for all our citizens. >> is president obama nominating chuck hagel as secretary of defense in in order to cut funding to the military? charles krauthammer will weigh in on that. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone, the factor begins right now. hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. aborting babies at taxpayers expense that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. we have been taking a very hard look at a disturbing situation that may be a major violation, maybe of federal law. in 1976 congress passed the hyde amendment w
low-profile gun law already on the books, a law you that probably don't even know about that's hidden in a very surprising place. we think you need to know about it because critics say this law damages our ability to truly know, using serious science, the impact that guns have on public health and public safety, impeding research on gun safety, preventing doctors even from talking to patients about the potential health risks that come with gun ownership. now, advocates of the law say it protects the rights of gun owners. you can decide for yourself. as we reported last week, the national rifle association managed to push this stealth ledge slaix into president obama's health care reform bill. the question is how did they do it and why and why whatever you think of the law one of the president's top allies, a democrat, actually helped the nra get it passed? no surprise that there's a big dose of politics involved here. jim acosta tonight is keeping them honest. >> reporter: when president obama signed national health care reform into law, few in washington knew that buried in the legis
on state and federal marijuana laws. then a discussion on combating terrorism and national security. after that a look at the projected cuts in defense spending. tomorrow on "washington journal" we'll discuss president obama's nominee for defense secretary former nebraska senator chuck hagel. our guest is gary schmidt with the american enterprise institute followed by emerging markets in developing country. we're joined with morgan stanley investment management. he spends one week in a different developing country and will discuss his book "breakout nations." live on washington journal on c-span. >> if you ask how many are self-identified libertarians, depending on which poll you look at, you might be getting between 10% and 15%. if you ask questions like if you give people a battery of questions about different ideological things like do you believe in x and do you believe in y? then you track those, depending on which poll you get up to 30% of americans that call themselves libertarian. if you ask the following question -- are you economically conservative but socially liberal you say ha
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
is right, explainn? >> i think it is a silly code to have and when you have something in the law it is applied evenly to everyone and they should be forced to follow the law. down the road change the law and make it where you can grow your veggie garden. if this is a law, the law is an ass. >> this shows the idiacy of government. can't make a distinction between a vegetable garden and raising python and having a toxic waste dump. they say it doesn't enhance values, let the market decide. >> laws today don't have a common sense. there is so little common sense . doesn't it add to the perception. >> let the market decide. this is more me, me, me stuff. people who object to it. bought a house with man cured front lines and what is happening to them. i sent a friend to look at it is a farming front and out of place. the people who bought house next door. their property values have gone down. he should let the market decide to take a hit. >> emac, what about property rights. >> they should put a walmart in the corner. >> i am kidding. orland open where this is happening, professes to
on his own is to say the least eight tortured reasoning. and as a matter of law, the federal borrowing limit is set by congressional approval. the white house, not as adventurous as the democrats in congress to send that letter. the white house unwilling to take on more than one constitutional amendment and challenge at a time. white house spokesman jay carney today. >> the proposition on the 14th amendment has not changed. let's be clear. congress has the responsibility and the sole authority to raise the debt ceiling. congress must do its job. lou: the administration does appear willing to go around congress to enact at least some gun-control measures. we will be debating tonight the administration's efforts to broaden and control in this country, talking with former birdie campaign president richard a. bourne in constitutional law professor david. vice-president joe biden today met with victims and gun-control advocates and stress the administration's determination to take action on gun-control, even by its executive order. it is the first of a series of meetings that the president'
perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i
to democratize the way we make laws in this country. the more people have a say in writing the law, the betert law. the fewer the people the worse the law. big corporations, for example, shouldn't write corporate tax law, and gun owners shouldn't be the only people involved in gun law. anybody can get shot by a gun, killed by a gun, and they all ought to have a say. and, that ladies and gentlemen, as joe biden would say, includes all of us. all of us should make gun law, not just the gun people. so let's go at it. and please don't, please don't lose interest. this is a test of strength. keep your grip on this gun safety issue because the other side is still into keeping theirs. you know, with their cold dead hands. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. we live in a country where a teacher can have a gun in a classroom and not tell the parents about it? we're going to do something about it. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> teachers can carry a f
ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays
obsessed with a small town town of lobbyists and law may curse. i think that's a fair concern to have but to make such of her road generalization about any party that they think is a tad unfair. >> host: mark is next, democratic caller, stone mountain georgia. >> caller: good morning. hi. i have a question about boehner and the party of no. where is he trying to go with this and for the last caller about ron paul, crystal from your magazine called the canon and ron paul -- and ron paul talking about the golden rule as far as policies, what do you guys want them to to achieve and 2016 besides war with iran, you know? what do you guys plan to do and i want to get your reaction to try to understand. >> guest: bill crystal is the editor of "the weekly standard" and that's another conservative journal of opinion. i work for the "national review" and i'm there reporter for national review. the ron paul question again is a very fair one to raise. i think the presence of people like thomas massey and brad pollin the senate, the ron paul movement, i was there at the sunbelt when they had their
in the troubled region of afghanistan and pakistan. he said we would carry on this fight while upholding the law and our values and we would work with our allies and partners wherever possible. he also made it clear we would not hesitate to use military force against terrorists who don't pose a direct threat to america. he said he had intelligence about terrorists, even as in pakistan, he would act to protect the american people. it is especially fitting we have this discussion today. one year ago, president tibullus facing the scenario he discussed at the woodrow wilson center five years ago. he did not hesitate to act. soon thereafter, are special operations forces were moving toward the compound in pakistan where we believed the osama bin laden might be hiding. at the end of the day, president obama could confirm justice had been delivered to those responsible for the attacks on september 11, 2001. the-phyllis sullivan law and was armas strategic blow yet. credit for that success belongs to the courageous forces that carries out -- carried out that mission at extraordinary threat to their liv
investigation; there was a time when law enforcement only focused on investigation. chief suhr recognize importance of having advocacy groups located directly in the special victims unit. family can meet with investigators and have access to services in the system as they move forward. with the efforts of kathy black and -- svu has a children's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforcement agencies across the region who a
laws including gun ownership restrictions for the mentally ill, a state ban on assault weapons, and limits on large magazine clips. >> the gun owners are not going to give them up. our best chance is to least know who is owned them and what is the nature of that person and their behavior. >> in virginia, governor mcdonnell says he is open to the idea of arming school officials. the general assembly last year repealed a law limiting gun purchases to one per month. this virginia resident thinks there should be new laws. >> they are so regularly available here. >> walmart said its executives would be too busy to attend. today they said they will head to washington for the task force meeting at the white house. >> virginia governor bob mcdonnell announced today who would take part in a newly created panel to schurick the safety of students and teachers in the classroom. they will review school policies and identify funding challenges. the panel includes people from law enforcement education, and the father of a virginia tech student killed in the 2007 shooting. the first meeting wi
i have been former law enforcement and i should bring to the attention of the people at some time ago, the supreme court made a decision that said the police do not have a duty to protect the individual citizen, only society at large. what does that mean to you? people need to realize that the police are mostly reactionary when it comes to a crime or when you need to call them. a lot of times, while they are waiting for them to get there, the crime has occurred and the perpetrators have left. i carry concealed and i have been doing it for some years. i know that if i was in a situation where there was somebody going nuts with a gun and killing people, i would not have to think about reacting to that situation. people need to realize when they pass all of these laws, it is just the camel's nose under the tent. people make a mistake when they think this is going to go smoothly and people are going to give up their rights easily. just food for thought. it is a right and it should not be infringed upon. it's a right and have a great day. >> on tuesday see, calling from omaha, neb.. >>
the ability and the will of the u.s. government to enforce the law. at the borders and in the u.s. interior. this so-called demand for lead to me andirst my colleagues on the panel to invest in understanding as well as is possible the investments, effectiveness, and consequences, including the human consequences. of the nation posted a deep commitment to enforcement and the rule of law -- consequences of the mission's deep commitment to enforcement and the rule of law -- consequences of the nation's the commitment to enforcement and the rule of law. no nation in the world has been as determine, has made as deep and the expense of a commitment to or has had as steep a rich in its enforcement efforts as the u.s. has had. he reached spans from local court rooms and jailed all the way to the ability of travelers to the united states to be able to travel to the united states, including to be able to really get on a plane to come to the united states. an extension of u.s. borders while beyond the physical borders of the united states. this is not the first time the migration policy institute has
this issue. there are a lot of gun laws in america. brookings has put the number at 300. some have said it's as high as 20,000, but a department of justice study found that 80% of inmates obtained their guns illegally. so 80% of inmates for gun laws obtained their guns illegally. isn't the first thing to do to enforce the laws we have? >> absolutely right. terrific point and it's a point that i make constantly because my background is in law enforcement. i was attorney general of the state of connecticut for 20 years and a federal prosecutor as united states attorney for four and a half years. the best laws on the books are dead letter unless enforced, so we need more resources. absolutely right. both at the state and federal level to enforce existing laws and if that executive action or order involves more resources or more vigorous enforcement of existing laws, improving that national database, the national enforcement criminal background system, all to the better. >> so, you're saying the executive order, that the president could do, could be you know, putting more people, more resource
of impoverished communities of color, law-enforcement incentives aimed at the number of arrests law-enforcement makes rather than quality of the arrests, racial profiling and rapid prison building some of which has entailed huge pockets for private companies in this country. as a result the united states incarcerate almost a quarter of the prisoners in the entire world, we have only 5% of the world's population. war on drugs which is a term coined by president nixon 40 years ago has not only exponentially increased the number of people behind bars through altering law-enforcement priorities and incentives but also promoted sentencing reform policies that have kept people in prison for dramatically longer periods of time and this has largely been over the last 4 years as a result of a lot of lawmaking by anecdote. when you hear about what named after individuals usually is in response to a terrible crime that has been committed but often has far reaching consequences far beyond what lawmakers even conceive of when they enact this kind of legislation. you see that with the polyglot mu
as to try to uncover the fears and suspicions that this figure western democracy. the law took effect in france it is illegal to cover the face of any public space from parks to shops although it does not mention women, a muslim, a veil or burqa it was introduced as a muslim veil that imprisons women and threatens french by use of dignity and equality. although france is the first country to enact a full day and similar restrictions are being considered oliver europe as some have other types of restrictions. the belgian chamber of representatives voted forays similar ban on the that it is expected to be challenged. spain, 2010. the assembly their league rejected the pay and of zepa burqa in all public places and similar laws are in progress in italy. in switzerland after a popular referendum to banda construction of minarets despite the fact very few mosques in switzerland had them there only for in the whole country of 150 mosques. and it is clearly symbolic with the architectural issue. july 2011 tear struck northern europe. murdering approximately 76 people on the government buildi
an extremely good idea. we have more gun laws now than we know what to do with. you instructed us not to address the second amendment. that one phrase in there, to infringe, seems to be happening quite a lot lately. i have a lot of friends in town who have businesses that revolves around a second amendment. in this economy, i do not think we need to close any more businesses. thank you. [applause] >> i am a police officer here. thank you for coming out. you're one of the few congressmen who is taken the initiative to do this. you called sandy hook begun tragedy. it was a human tragedy. -- a gun tragedy. it was not. it was a human tragedy. you lost for solutions. i am not going to stand up here and lecture -- asked for solutions. i am not going to stand up here and lecture. i will say i carry ar-15 and my car every day. -- in my car every day. i find it deplorable that my wife may not be able to when i am gone. she cannot protect yourself, she does not need it, but i do, and you do? everyone should have the ability to protect themselves if needed. the solution, i know you guys are
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle th
at work, local law enforcement, local da's, people who are getting out of their lanes. the old paradigm of a da and a attorney and a police officer, you get bad guys, you put them this jail. you know, i'm telling you, i've done a lot of hate crimes cases and i know today's bullies are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that we have done, ruslyn and
are saying we need to have tougher gun laws and others who are saying tie ing take a look more comprehensive view of this in order to find solutions. >> i'm glad you mentioned armed guards. that was arpaio who will be a g in just moments. >> reporter: great segue. >> keep your eye on developments. that is fascinating what's happening and how quickly it's happening. >>> we also have other breaking news. i'm going to segue to new york city with our live pictures. check out the front of that ferry. that damage caused a whole lot more damage to people inside. about 50 people were hurt when that ferry crashed down near wall street. one person actually critically injured. apparently this was a very busy pier in lower manhattan. and our alison kosik rushed right to the scene. she's getting a handle on all of this. alison, i know this started to unfold about 9:00 this morning. that's a peak commute time. so what's the very latest? what were you able to find? >> reporter: just to let everybody know who doesn't live in new york, there are lots of way people commute into the city. some people drive, so
, and i think early voting has law lot of voters into thinking "i can vote anywhere." and the only races they care about will be counted and in some cases the lower level races, they may be upset about. but it is like a shrug it for them and they say, oh, well. i think some of the lower races, some of the ballot initiatives, the more localized issues -- there might be a real problem in the end. so. >> thank you. i have a few things that have been touched on by almost everybody here. just to the voters, about being prepared. i know in arlington county, you can go on the web site. it tells you exactly where to go, exactly what is going to be on your ballot. if we can get that information out there, we can speed up the process. if they show at the precincts and are prepared, we will have a quicker time. and for poll workers, it keeps coming back. and arlington county, the poll workers to have been at a few elections knew how to handle these situations and shared that information with new poll workers. i would encourage the new poll workers to keep coming back year after year. >> ok. thank y
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,591 (some duplicates have been removed)

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